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Frequently Asked Questions | Silverado Karate

1. What is Silverado Karate?

Silverado Karate offers a wide variety of techniques which is the result of blending styles of martial arts, from the hardest to the softest:

  • Shotokan; developed from various Japanese Karate styles by Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957) and his son Yoshitaka Funakoshi (1906–1945).
  • Ryokukai Aikido; this martial art utilizes an opponent's momentum to cause imbalance resulting in the opponent being rendered harmless.
  • Iai-jutsu; this art of drawing the Japanese sword, katana, is one of the Japanese koryū martial art disciplines in the education of the classical warrior (bushi) 
  • Judo and JuJitsu; it involves using holds and leverage to unbalance and control the opponent.

2. What is the difference between Silverado Karate & other styles?

All styles of martial arts differ in the application of body dynamics for the ultimate means of self defense. Some styles use circular whipping motions to create power, some use straight linear movements, and still others use non-resisting methods.
 
The study of Silverado Karate utilizes five scientific methods, contraction/expansion, rotation, vibration, drop weight/lift weight and shifting, to achieve dynamic movement, punching, kicking, and striking for self defense.

3. Is Silverado Karate good for self-defense?

Silverado Karate is excellent for self-defense. The wide variety of techniques in both areas, hard and soft, enable one to apply techniques accordingly when faced with various situations. For example, when confronted with several attackers coming from different directions, mobility is the best self-defense, and allows elimination of the attackers one by one. Self-confidence, self-control, modesty, and a non-defeatist attitude greatly enhance your ability to defend yourself.

4. Silverado Karate for Kids

The great richness of technical program includes, besides the functional preparatory gymnastics, individual exercises (Kihon and Kata) and exercises with a partner (Kumite). 
Kihon and Kata teach children how to take the maximum advantage from the potentialities of their own bodies. Moreover this training allows children to gain self-confidence, thanks to the continuous overcoming of limits they considered insurmountable.
Best Kids Martial Arts & Self Defense Classes. We Teach children to have increased confidence, improve their attention span and give them the ability to defends themselves against bullies.

6. Is there an age limit in Silverado Karate?

No. A child as young as four can learn Silverado Shotokan Karate. A person as old as seventy can also learn Silverado Shotokan Karate under proper instruction.

 

Realistic goals are set based on the needs and ability of each student.

7. Which Martial Arts style is the best?

There is no such thing as one best style. The effectiveness of a system depends on the ability of the student to learn and the ability of the teacher to teach. It is the person who makes the style, not the style that makes the person.

 

In Silverado Karate, a wide range of techniques are offered to provide flexibility in training, so that even the physically and spiritually weak individual can develop their bodies and minds gradually and naturally. Silverado Karate is also excellent for young people. The instruction is geared toward building the student's moral character as well.

8. What kind of people practice Silverado Karate?

Classes are open to everyone regardless of age, sex, or physical ability. There are members who train to compete in tournaments, as well as people with physical disabilities. Some members practice Karate 2 hours a day; while others, because of other priorities in their lives, can attend class only once a week. Anyone can become a good member in Silverado Karate as long as they have the desire and determination to do so. 

10. What kind of philosophy is taught in Silverado Karate?

Mainly, there are two types of philosophy that we teach in Silverado Karate:

  1. General philosophy: This deals with overall development -- that is, honesty, high moral character, self-discipline, respect for others and self, humility, and patience.
  2. Martial arts philosophy: How to judge a situation, when to fight, when not to fight, how to fight, where to hit, with what to hit, with what kind of weapons to defend, what to do against multiple assailants, and many other points of strategy.

11. How can I recognize a good instructor from a bad one?

A good instructor is someone who:

  • loves to teach and help others
  • is sincere, considerate, mature, confident
  • has understanding and patience
  • can motivate the students
  • has a good attitude and good techniques
  • cares and is protective of her or his students


Observing classes is a good way to judge whether or not a school will be a good learning environment for you. Watch how a class is conducted; see if the students and instructors treat each other with respect and care; observe the safety measures employed to keep the students safe in their training. Listen to your intuitive feelings about the group and the instructors, and try a few classes on a trial basis.
 

12. What is a training session like?

A well organized training period is about 1 to 2 hours hour.


The training will usually follow this general outline:

  • Slowly and gently raise your heart rate.
  • Limber your body with stretching.
  • Raise your heart rate aerobically with basic techniques (punching, kicking, blocking) for at least 20 minutes.
  • Condition your response ability by way of anaerobic controlled pre-arranged attack and defend scenarios.
  • Improve your general karate form with the study of kata (formal exercise routines). If your skill level permits, free sparring.
  • Strengthen and tone your muscle structure with calisthenics.
  • Cool you down with gentle stretching.

Sometime during the session, there is an instructional period that will lecture and demonstrate a principle or technique to focus on.

13. What does ranking in Oscar Silvera's Shotokan Karate represent?

Silverado Shotokan Karate uses 5 colored belts and the black belt - a total of 7 belts. Colored belts are given the classification of Kyu, which means level. The black belt is classified by the term Dan, meaning degree of advancement. There are 10 Dans (or 10 degrees) within the black belt classification.

The following chart illustrates the relationship of colored belts to Kyu designations, and the start of the first black belt Dan/Degree:

 

14. How long does it take to become a black belt in Silverado Shotokan Karate?

The average student that trains diligently, at least three times a week, can potentially become a black belt in about 3 1/2 to 4 years. This large window of time is based on individual skill and natural ability. I have never met a black belt, no matter how naturally skill he or she is, that actually has the skills of a true black belt, without at least 3 1/2 to 4 years of consistent training. Try as you may, there is no substitute for time to balance the skills you acquire.

15. Is it safe to practice Silverado Karate?

Safety is of utmost importance in Silverado Karate. Realistically, most people practice martial arts to protect themselves, so there is no reason one should get hurt while practicing. Instructors are always present to supervise all sparring, their safety is enhanced with the use of soft, padded gloves and feet protectors. Non-contact rules for below black belt rank is strictly enforced.

16. Why do you meditate before and after each class?

Meditation is done before and after each class and in special sessions. Meditation gives you knowledge about yourself, enlightens and deepens your thoughts, thus eliminating troubled thoughts from your mind. Meditation is a way of flowing toward spiritual growth. It is a search for perfection (beauty, truth, and goodness), a need for a meaningful existence (the art of appreciation) or an escape to find freedom in a permanent life. Meditation also helps cultivate the awareness of our internal strength, thus allowing the perfect coordination of mind, body, and spirit.

17. Will I be required to fight in tournaments in order to advance?

NO. Even though members of Silverado Karate participate in tournaments from time to time and do extremely well, we do not specialize in tournament preparation. Participation allows us to learn from and expose ourselves to other styles. Silverado Karate is a strong style because of its multi-faceted aspects. However, the tournaments give us a testing ground on which to evaluate our techniques. Tournaments also provide opportunities to make friends and share in the martial arts experience. You cannot grow if you isolate yourself.


Tournament participation is completely voluntary. Learning to win over yourself, not others, is the ultimate goal. A win over others is only temporary. When you win over yourself, you become your own master and the rewards are permanent.

ABOUT THE CHIEF INSTRUCTOR

Sensei Silvera is the Dojo's Hombu Cho (Headquarter's Director), Chief Instructor and USA Technical Director of the International Seitokan Karate-do Association. 

He started training in variety of Martial Arts; such as Iaido, Aikido, Taekwondo, Judo, Krav Maga, Tai chi, Kickboxing, Kung fu and others. His martial arts training started in Lima-Peru, back in 1984. Currently holds 5th Dan in Shotokan Karate, Black Belt Dan in Iaido, and in Tae Kwon Do. Sensei Silvera offers insights into the relationships between various martial arts and the effective training methods found in those arts. He is also a member in good-standing of the USA Karate-do Federation, the Shinshin Ryu Iajutsu and the International Budo Ryokukai. 

He has been fortunate enough to train many years in Karate with Sensei Victor Torres (Lima-Peru), Sensei Hector E. Lizano Palomino (6th DAN - WKF) Peruvian-Junior Kata Coach, Mirian Lizano (International Seitokan), Sensei Kiei Gibo (World Champion Master - WUKO 2007), Sensei Yasu Tanaka and Sensei Katsumi Niikura (8th DAN - Founder of the International Budo Ryokukai)

​Sensei Silvera has attended seminars held by world renown Martial Arts Instructors like: Sensei Masao Kagawa (8th Dan, World Chief Instructor Japan Karate Shotorenmei), Sensei Azuma Takashi (Daido Juku, Founder), Sensei Akio Tamashiro, Sensei Bill "Superfoot" Wallace, Sensei Falah Kanani (6th Dan JKA San Diego), Vince Morris 8th Dan Kissaki-Kai, Sensei Scott Langley 6th Dan, Sensei Takeshi Kitagawa Sensei 6th Dan JKS, Sensei Ali Hamie - 8th Degree Black Belt WKF/JKAand other good instructors.  

One of his latest awards: Japan Karate Shoto Federation Pan American 2010 Kata Champion (Gold Medal) and Kumite Champion (Silver Medal). 

TESTIMONIALS

Sensei Oscar Silvera is a great instructor. He has the gift for teaching and unique approach to all his students. If you are looking for a Karate school, look no more, this is the place to be..

     

I have trained in Shotokan Karate for several years and a few other martial arts. I have had some very good Senseis and some not so good. In all my years I have never been taught to such a degree of understanding as I am now receiving from Sensei Oscar Silvera..

My daughter and I train together here at Silverado Nippon Karate and really appreciate the personal attention given to each student. Sensei Oscar takes everyones development very seriously and personally...     Sensei Oscar and his staff are very thorough and provide a wide range of both technical and practical training. I am very impressed with the individual attention Sensei provides to all of his students...

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